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Acarbose Cardiovascular Evaluation



Steering Committee Member

Hertzel C. Gerstein, MD MSc FRCPC

Hertzel C. Gerstein

Professor
McMaster University

 

 


Dr. Hertzel C. Gerstein is an Endocrinologist and Professor at McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, where he holds the Population Health Institute Chair in Diabetes Research. He is also Director of the Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism and Director of the Diabetes Care and Research Program. His research focuses on the prevention and therapy of diabetes and its many consequences, and on the role of dysglycemia and relative insulin insufficiency on the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment and other chronic conditions. He is currently the international joint principal investigator (PI) of a number of international clinical trials including: the ACCORD study of cardiovascular prevention in type 2 diabetes; the ORIGIN study of cardiovascular prevention in people with IFG, IGT, new diabetes or established diabetes; and the DREAM study of diabetes prevention. He is also the founding director of Diabetes Hamilton – a community-based approach that facilitates the ability of Hamiltonians with diabetes (and their health care providers) to uses all of the community’s resources to best manage the disease.

Dr. Gerstein has published more than 150 papers, editorials and commentaries, mainly on diabetes-related issues. He is co-editor of the textbook Evidence-Based Diabetes Care, an Associate Editor for ACP Journal Club, and on the editorial boards of the Canadian Journal of Diabetes, the Journal of Diabetes, and Diabetes & Vascular Disease Research. He is also past (founding) chair of the evidence-based committee for the CDA Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Diabetes in Canada. He has been the recipient of several honours including the Canadian Diabetes Association’s Young Scientist Award (1999), Frederick G. Banting award (1999), and Charles H. Best award (2007).