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UKPDS Outcomes Model

Background

UKPDS Outcomes Model v2 (OM2)

OM2 is the new and revised version 2 of the UKPDS Outcomes Model. As with the previous version (OM1), it is based on patient-level data from the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study which now extends to 30 years of followup. This computer simulation model is designed to assess the total burden of disease over an extrapolated lifetime for populations with type 2 diabetes. It uses a wide variety of input data, including knowledge of previous clinical events for individuals, and has the ability to take into account changes in some risk factor levels over time. If these updated risk factor levels are not available the model provides methods of calculating them. OM2 outputs include Estimated Life Expectancy, Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy, and costs for each member of a given population.

OM2 is a computer simulation model for estimating the long-term impact of health interventions for people with type 2 diabetes. It has been developed primarily to assess the lifetime benefits of diabetes-related interventions. In particular, it is intended to facilitate economic evaluations by estimating changes in outcomes such as life expectancy and quality adjusted life expectancy, when risk factors such as blood glucose level, blood pressure, lipid levels and smoking status are changed. It can be applied to any population with type 2 diabetes. Other potential applications include:

The UKPDS Outcomes Model has been used in a range of research, clinical and commercial applications worldwide, as well as by NICE.
View the OM2 manual here.

UKPDS Outcomes Model v1 (OM1)

The OM1 manual is also available here but this version of the UKPDS Outcomes Model is no longer available and will not be maintained going forward.

Supported platforms

The UKPDS Outcomes Model can operate on Windows and Mac OS X platforms and utilise multiple cores if available. It uses Microsoft Excel workbooks to store input and output data which can be queued for processing in turn by the OM2 Controller Application which runs the model.

Contact us

For licensing queries please see the Licensing page for contact details.

For all queries concerning the UKPDS Outcomes Model and its appropriate use, please read the manual and the web site FAQ.  If your question remains unanswered, email herc@dph.ox.ac.uk

For purely technical enquiries concerning software installation, email outcomes.model@dtu.ox.ac.uk

News

Release of software for new and revised UKPDS Outcomes Model v2

11-May-2015
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The updated software for the new and fully revised second version of the UKPDS Outcomes Model© (OM2) was released today.

The UKPDS Outcomes Model© is a computerised simulation tool designed to estimate Life Expectancy, Quality Adjusted Life Expectancy and the cumulative costs of complications in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)....

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Outcomes Model 1.3 released

21-Jan-2011
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Corrected smoking status check and amputation output and added cohort outputs in Standalone version
Smoking status is now calculated once per loop instead of once per patient
Cumulative Event rate output for events has been replaced with Event rate and Long-term history rate
Diabetes related death has been separated into a separate output sheet from other death
A new group column has been added to the Inputs sheet after the ID column. This allows outputs of 2 patient groups to be compared
The Input Checks have been combined into a single sheet
The Excel macros are now digitially signed

[Link]

Outcomes Model 1.2.1 released

03-Jun-2009
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Corrections
Corrected an issue on page 17 of the manual (Example #1) where the example incorrectly stated that the age entered should be 60. The correct value is 59....

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UKPDS Outcomes Model version 1.2 available

21-Jun-2007
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Changes in Version 1.2Bug Fixes

a) Incorrect handling of updated smoking status risk factor values has been fixed. In version 1.1 past smokers (value 1) were treated as current smokers (value 2), and current smokers were treated as a doubling of the smoking effect....

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[News archive]